Sophie was two years old when she died on May 18, 2017.

Shelby and Jonathan thought their two-year-old daughter had allergies when she became ill.

Her doctor suspected she had asthma because she was having difficulty breathing. But it soon became clear that things were far worse than they had anticipated.

Sophie was supposed to have an allergic reaction test a few days later. However, she never took the test.

One night, she stopped breathing.

It was every parent’s worst nightmare. Shelby and Jonathan requested that an ambulance be dispatched. They were on their way to the hospital in minutes.

It was only thereafter the doctors confirmed Sophie’s condition was far worse than allergies or asthma.

Sophie’s little chest had a tumor the size of a tennis ball, according to the doctors. She was diagnosed with T-cell lymphoma. The little girl was suddenly fighting for her life.

Unfortunately, aggressive chemotherapy had no effect on cancer’s spread. Sophie’s ability to walk, talk, use her hands, and eat was impacted by the treatments.

When Sophie was fighting for her life, her parents spent countless hours with her in the hospital.

Sophie’s mother Shelby didn’t leave her daughter’s bed. Shelby’s only concern was Sophie and how she was being treated.

Her weak body needed a bone marrow transplant.

In this difficult and chaotic situation, the mother noticed a nurse who tried not to be noticed, but Shelby watched her.

Shelby posted a photo of the nurse with her back to her on a Facebook page set up by Sophie’s parents to document Sophie’s battle with the disease.

Shelby wrote, “I see you,” revealing that she had witnessed everything the nurse was doing for her daughter.

Shelby, the Mother, wrote:

«I notice you. I sit on this couch all day and notice you. You make every effort to go unnoticed by me and my child».

«When she sees you and cries, I see your face drop a little. You try everything to calm her fears and win her over. I see you hesitate to stick her or remove bandages. You say ‘No owies’ and ‘I’m sorry more than most people say ‘thank you in a single day».

«I see all of those rubber bracelets on your arms and wrapped around your stethoscope, each one for a child that you’ve cared for and loved».

«I see you stroke her little bald head and tuck her covers around her tightly. I see you holding the crying mom that got bad news. I see you trying to chart on the computer while holding the baby whose mom can’t — or won’t be at the hospital with her».

Shelby posted a photo of the nurse with her back to her on a Facebook page set up by Sophie’s parents to document Sophie’s battle with the disease.

Shelby wrote, “I see you,” revealing that she had witnessed everything the nurse was doing for her daughter.

Shelby, the Mother, wrote:

«I notice you. I sit on this couch all day and notice you. You make every effort to go unnoticed by me and my child».

«When she sees you and cries, I see your face drop a little. You try everything to calm her fears and win her over. I see you hesitate to stick her or remove bandages. You say ‘No owies’ and ‘I’m sorry more than most people say ‘thank you’ in a single day».

«I notice you. We can all see you. No amount of snack baskets or cards can fully express how much you are appreciated. Every day, you are Jesus to us. Without you, our children would not receive what they require. Without you, moms like me would not feel sane or heard. You save our babies, and we wouldn’t be able to do it without you».

Shelby’s heartfelt message touched not only the nurses for whom she wrote the post, but also other parents who had similar experiences and saw sisters as the backbone of the pediatric department.

The work of these sisters is difficult to imagine, and they repeat the worst times of their lives every day.

Sophie, sadly, did not grow up to say “thank you” to all the nurses who fought for her life.

Her small frame couldn’t handle the treatments or aggressive cancer.

On December 22, 2017, cancer returned with a vengeance, and the family decided to discontinue treatment.

Shelby and Jonathan were given 13 days to cuddle, read, sing, watch movies, and love Sophie before she died in their arms on January 4, 2018.

«During this process, my goal was to be transparent and honest and to shed light on what really happens during the cancer war. I wanted to show the bad days as they were, but I also wanted to show God’s wonderful work in this process. I want to keep doing this as we go on with our lives without her», Shelby said.

Cancer is really the worst thing we can think of. Especially when it harms children.

Sophie’s story is a reminder to all of us to live every day as if he were the last. To love as if there was no tomorrow.

Her story also shows how wonderful the nurses and other staff in the hospital, are and how they deserve to be recognized.

They help, play, tell stories, give advice and consolation, touch countless lives, and care not only for their little patients but also for their families.

They enter a battle that most of us try to avoid. And they do this day after day to one family after another.

Share the words of mother Shelby on the nurses in the hospital so that more people can read about the amazing work they do.

By Mariam

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